Rule Submission TitleRenaming of "Non-Officiated"
Rule Book Year2022
Date CreatedJune 26, 2021
Rule Change ID146
Existing Rule #4.D.2, 5.A.2, 11.E (twice), 13.D.1, 13.D.1.c, 13.L
Original Rule Text

4.D.2. In non-officiated play, the server normally calls the score, but the server’s partner may call the score if the server is unable to call the score. The person calling the score shall not change during the game.

5.A.2. In doubles, teams may change the starting server between games and should notify the referee. In non-officiated matches, the team should notify the opponents if there was a starting server change. The starting server for the game is the player wearing the starting server form of identification. There is no fault or penalty for failure to make the notifications. Once a game has started, if the referee notices a starting server has changed, the referee will annotate the scoresheet accordingly, after the rally has completed.

11.E. Broken or Cracked Ball. If a referee is present, players may appeal to the referee before the serve occurs to determine if a ball is broken or cracked. If the appeal is before the serve occurs, the referee will call “Time”, inspect the ball, and either replace it or return it into play. The referee will recall the score. In non-officiated matches, players may replace a cracked ball before the serve occurs. If any player suspects the ball is or becomes cracked after the serve, play must continue until the end of the rally. If, in the judgment of the referee, a broken or cracked ball impacted the outcome of a rally, the referee will call for a replay with a replacement ball. In non-officiated play, if the players do not agree that a cracked ball impacted the outcome of the rally, the rally stands as played.

13.D.1. Non-Officiated Play.

13.D.1.c. In the spirit of good sportsmanship, players are expected to call faults on themselves as soon as the fault is committed or detected. The fault call must happen before the next serve occurs. For non-officiated matches, if a player believes the opponent(s) have committed a fault, they may mention the specific fault to the player(s) but have no
authority to enforce them. The final decision on fault resolution belongs to the player that allegedly committed the fault. The exception to which player has enforcement authority is provided in Rule 13.D.1.b.

13.L. Non-Officiated Play. Any player may request a referee or Tournament Director if:

Proposed Rule Change

4.D.2. In self-officiated play, the server normally calls the score, but the server’s partner may call the score if the server is unable to call the score. The person calling the score shall not change during the game.

5.A.2. In doubles, teams may change the starting server between games and should notify the referee. In self-officiated matches, the team should notify the opponents if there was a starting server change. The starting server for the game is the player wearing the starting server form of identification. There is no fault or penalty for failure to make the notifications. Once a game has started, if the referee notices a starting server has changed, the referee will annotate the scoresheet accordingly, after the rally has completed.

11.E. Broken or Cracked Ball. If a referee is present, players may appeal to the referee before the serve occurs to determine if a ball is broken or cracked. If the appeal is before the serve occurs, the referee will call “Time”, inspect the ball, and either replace it or return it into play. The referee will recall the score. In self-officiated matches, players may replace a cracked ball before the serve occurs. If any player suspects the ball is or becomes cracked after the serve, play must continue until the end of the rally. If, in the judgment of the referee, a broken or cracked ball impacted the outcome of a rally, the referee will call for a replay with a replacement ball. In self-officiated play, if the players do not agree that a cracked ball impacted the outcome of the rally, the rally stands as played.

13.D.1. Self-Officiated Play.

13.D.1.c. In the spirit of good sportsmanship, players are expected to call faults on themselves as soon as the fault is committed or detected. The fault call must happen before the next serve occurs. For self-officiated matches, if a player believes the opponent(s) have committed a fault, they may mention the specific fault to the player(s) but have no
authority to enforce them. The final decision on fault resolution belongs to the player that allegedly committed the fault. The exception to which player has enforcement authority is provided in Rule 13.D.1.b.

13.L. Self-Officiated Play. Any player may request a referee or Tournament Director if:

Reasoning Behind Suggested Change

The term "non-officiated" is inaccurate. "Self-officiated" is a more accurate term.

IFP Voting StatusAverage: 5.9 Detail:5,5,6,8,2,8,7
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